Drink Tank

Extra Aqua Vitae Nulla Salus

9.22.2005

10 Comments:

At 11:50 AM, Blogger oded said...

This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.

 
At 11:51 AM, Blogger oded said...

Source?

 
At 11:54 AM, Blogger joŇ°ko said...

My dad scored 150. I think IQ is hogwash, but I guess there's _some_ overlap between high IQ and high intelligence.

 
At 5:38 PM, Blogger Ivan said...

The questions isn't whether IQ is perfect. It is whether it's good enough to correlate to high or low liklihoods of certain events.

I would prefer, for instance, that my rational decision making is taken into account in the way I drive, and then my insurance rate. Why not use such information?

The source was a blog, linking to scientific american, but I think you can also find it here (which is an edited version of the image's URL).

 
At 1:44 AM, Blogger hexod.us said...

if you don't get into any accidents, then that is reflected in your insurance rate, and that's where a rational(or any other good) approach to driving pays off.

 
At 5:15 PM, Blogger Ivan said...

Insurance is far higher for young people. There should be at the very least a driving test to allow companies to guage your driving specifically, rather than rely on stats from your demographic.

A better use of IQ to affect policy is as follows: let anyone with a 130+ IQ immigrate into the US.

 
At 4:30 PM, Blogger hexod.us said...

i may be mistaken, but i feel like i have heard that you can take driving courses that will allow you to get a lower insurance rate. i need to look that up to confirm though.

 
At 4:42 PM, Blogger Miguel said...

Is that a high-IQ person debating society-wide changes to reward high IQ people more than society already does?

I thought it would take years of hard work to convert my LSAT score into money; I had no idea it could be done posting to a blog in my PJs...

 
At 10:31 PM, Blogger Ivan said...

For areas where intelligence, test of abilities, and history of past actions in context are not exclusively used in deciding something, well, they should be.

Immigration, college admissions, tax rates (shouldn't capital gains be regressively taxed on the percentage gain, or eliminated for above a certain percentage?).

So, yes, I'm saying intelligence should be rewarded more, if the measures mentioned above aren't used somewhere.

 
At 10:15 AM, Blogger Miguel said...

I think the transaction cost (finding sandardized results) outweighs any potential benifit (that'll probably change).

I actually think that in insurance the increasing ability to predict outcomes is a money loser - the more they utilize future-predicting techniques effectively, the more customers they'll lose, and the margins will be next to nothing (especially if they're catering to a high IQ market that shops obsessively for a better deal).

Being a proprieter of a blog called "Drink Tank" probably reflects more auto risk than your IQ can make up for...

College admissions do use tests, called the SAT, which are designed with colleges as the market to test a combination of things (including IQ) which corelate to future financial performance in life.

I doubt if there's studies as to how well capital gains corelates to IQ, but making money in the market is not an intelligence test (except if you're judging your daughter's husband, maybe). Start a new thread for capital gains tax issues, if that seems interesting.

Immigration is weighted in certain ways toward high IQ people (those who immigrate to work for an employer in a skilled industry).

 

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